New World War II photos to mark 100 years since the conflict ended


The United Press Association released a new collection of colored icons a century ago to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War.

Photographers captured a series of emotional scenes after the discovery of the ceasefire, including a Parade Victory shooting in London and the burial of the Unknown Warrior in a memorandum service in the UK capital in 1920.

The Unknown Warrior, an unknown British soldier killed on a European battleground, is buried in London

The Unknown Warrior, an unknown British soldier killed on a European battleground, is buried in London Credit: Click Sign in via AP Images

A German ship sees delivery at the end of the war.

A German ship sees delivery at the end of the war. Credit: Click Sign in via AP Images

Another strong photo shows that members of the public are paying their respects to dead soldiers at Cenotaph in London, where each year the National Monument Service of the United Kingdom.

Others show German prisoners of war in the homonymous town of Bethune and the delivery of a German U-boat to Harwich's British port. The photos were released before Peace Day on November 11th.

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Some events are planned to mark the end of the war, where about 8,500,000 people died and more than 21,000,000 were injured.

Veterans and members of the public will gather at the Cenotaph for Sunday's memory service, a ceremony attended by Queen Elizabeth II, as well as other officials.

In addition, the tower of the Tower of London has been filled with 10,000 flames to mark 100 years since the end of the war.

Journalists look down on a ditch in the First World War.

Journalists look down on a ditch in the First World War. Credit: Click Sign in via AP Images

The crowds go through Kentaif, a war memorial in London.

The crowds go through Kentaif, a war memorial in London. Credit: Click Sign in via AP Images

Elsewhere in the UK, director Danny Boyle has created an initiative called "Sea Pages", inviting citizens to gather on beaches to remember those who died in war.

"This will be a unique time to say goodbye and thank you for the millions of men and women who have left their coasts during the war, many of whom never return," Boyle said.

British soldiers guard German prisoners of war in France.

British soldiers guard German prisoners of war in France. Credit: Click Sign in via AP Images