President Donald Trump wants you to be very afraid


The Editorial Board, USA TODAY

Posted at 6:52 PM ET 1 November 2018 | Updated at 8:39 pm ET 1 November 2018

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In the 2018 election campaign, Trump continues to plunge into new levels of fear and hateful thinking about immigration, health care and tax cuts of fantasy: Our view

President Donald Tromm's election campaign for fear and suspicion began this week with a recent edition of the famous "Willie Horton" political advertising of the 1980s.

Horton's advertising highlighted a suspect of African-American mistreatment and was widely condemned to play racist fears. So what was it at the top of the Trump Twitter feed at Halloween? Plasma of a smiling, double-displaced Mexican immigrant was sentenced to death for the assassination of two Californian law officers, with a Trump warning: "It's outrageous what Democrats do in our country."

The fact that The Democrats had nothing to do with this man – or that undocumented immigrants do not actually commit less crimes than the Americans born in their homeland – obviously no matter how bold about the Republican candidates in the US. Senator Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., Named the ad "sick" and "just a new low in the campaign."

GINGRICH: President Trump reflects anger, not his creation

"Be afraid, be afraid of it" is a politically award-winning time. But Trump takes it to completely new levels:

►When some immigrants crossed the Guatemalan border region to enter Mexico last month and started walking in the United States to seek asylum, it may be wise to fill in the border patrol agents and the 2,000 troops of the National Guard already with a few hundred active members of logistics service (prohibited by law from any enforcement action). But that was not quite dramatic for the Trump. It declares a national state of emergency, describes migrants as invaders and sends 5,200 soldiers to the border, with an additional 8,000 to follow. This would create an army larger than the US military against the Taliban and terrorism in Afghanistan. It would also be extremely costly. a government study found that the 2006 troop deployment at the border costs $ 120 per person per day.

►Tipping in his anti-immigration theme, Trump reversed an unwilling promise of a campaign to deny citizenship to babies born in the USA to undocumented immigrants, a first-person right which most lawyers say is guaranteed by the 14th amendment and a subsequent Supreme Court decision. Trump boasts that he could change the Constitution with an executive order. Such a mandate, until prevented by a federal judge, could create a new class of infant children in a legal and administrative vacuum.

► With healthcare emerging as the top electoral issue, Trump promised without risk to demonstrations to ensure coverage of pre-existing conditions. Unless he has done the opposite, working poorly to undermine Obamacare's pre-existing coverage guarantees and adopts the same kind of "Mediscare" language that Democrats used to fight against Republicans.

Perhaps the most cynical measure promised on October 20 a 10% reduction in a middle-class tax this week. Of course, this did not happen. Firstly, Congress, which should approve the cut, is out of session. Thus, the Trump simply shifted the speeds and vaguely promised something after the election. The tax proposal, which came as news for lawmakers and even some White House employees, is a convincing twin, since its legislative achievement – a $ 1.5 trillion tax package that benefits disproportionately from wealthy – landed by thrombosis.

These electoral gestures of election by the president range from loss-making to non-functional to inaccessible. They represent the sound and the mania that eventually imply a little substance. Careful voters will see from within.

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