Women repair after sexual intercourse


When he was 15 and grew up in Los Angeles, Munsey began dating a guy who thought he was the real deal.

"I never had a friend before, he congratulated me, he was charming and he got me to eat," he remembers. "I was insecure and I did not have much confidence … And here I had this 24-year-old friend, I was not something special?"

Then she began to abuse her. She forced her to sell her body. Months later he was arrested for prostitution.

"I really did not talk to anyone about this, probably for 30 years, except my therapist," Munsey said, now 61 years old. "I was really afraid that people would judge me, I was afraid to share this part of my life."

Decades later, armed with her own survival and years of research and experience as a clinical social worker, Munsey shared her personal story with a church mentor who also wanted to do something about the problem of sexing in San Diego.

The city is among the top 13 sex-trafficking sites in the country, according to the FBI.

However, at that moment, Munsey found very few programs to help the victims.

"It just triggered something to me," he said. "I always knew God would use that time that somehow prevented me. I was not just wasting time."

In 2009, he founded GenerateHope, a nonprofit company that offers a safe place for survivors of sexual trafficking to heal and build new lives. The group provides long-term housing, treatment, education and medical care.

"It's not just about creating security physically but also psychologically," Munsey said.

Participants attend classes to get trapped in high school and prepare for college. They receive individual therapy and there are five group treatments weekly focused on the traumatic experience of having sex.

Women can stay in GenerateHope's safe house for up to two years and benefit from a variety of support services with volunteers such as horseback riding and art, dance and yoga.

"We are really trying to help them realize all the skills and abilities they have within them," Munsey said.

To date, Munsey says that GenerateHope has been a shelter for more than 100 victims – few to 18 – women who call it "survivors".

Allie Torgan of CNN spoke to Munsey about her work. Below is a modified version of their conversation.

CNN: What led you to start your program?

Susan Munsey: I am a psychotherapist and I know the kind of harm it does to children, adults. It really bothered me that there were no programs in San Diego. My vision was to have a home where women could come and find security – and find themselves.

This is so important to me because I was marketable. She did the same thing I see happening to women today. I was physically abused. He broke my chin. It would be a unique thing. And it turned into two months.

I was 16 when I was arrested. I was handcuffed and went to jail. He was humiliating. But he gave me enough idea of ​​how I was in life and how degrading this is. And how terrible it is for someone to be in such a situation where you are forced to have sex with strangers and give the money back to this guy who is supposed to love you.

CNN: Who are the traffickers in the US?

Munsey: Traffickers or police officers can be many different types of people. It could be someone who has delivered the business, so to speak. He could be an uncle or a dad.

It's something gangs have found to be a very lucrative business – better than weapons and drugs. Because if you grab your car with guns or drugs, it's a bust. You can catch in your car with a girl, have already been pampered to say nothing, or say, "This is my uncle" or "my friend". Fines are much higher, believe or not, for weapons and medicines than for trafficking in women and girls.

CNN: Who are the victims you see?

Munsey: Trafficking in human beings can hit anyone. It is in our entire nation. We know that the vast majority are girls. Boys tend, I think, not to mention so much. Statistics vary a little. depends on the research you are looking at. Some will report that girls are moving up to the 12th year. What we have seen mainly is that women are moving first about 14, 15 years old.

CNN: How do traffickers hire victims?

Munsey: They are looking for new, vulnerable women. Many of them are on the Internet now. Dating websites are a great area where women can be deceived. Also toys. They pretend to be someone younger. He can put someone close to the age of this child and develop a friendship.

They are pretty smooth to get into the heads of these children – their brains do not grow fully, so they really do not know how to escape this guy. They are afraid to tell their parents. They will certainly not call the police. So it's really a slippery slope.

CNN: What are your tips for families?

Munsey: I would like people to know that smugglers are going to go to the places where young people go out. Sites like shopping centers, cafes, public transport, the internet, schools even. Sometimes I will send someone who seems quite young to a school to recruit.

Be careful with dating websites. It can happen to someone in college. And it is so important that parents help protect their children from this internet risk. I encourage parents to know their children's passwords. To check frequently what their children do. Keep computers in a common room, not in the bedrooms.

It is not necessary that your children can not trust, but that they can not trust these children.

Do you want to get involved? check it Create a site and see how to help.

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